WHERE GOOD IDEAS COME FROM (excerpt)

Updated: Feb 1, 2019

I'm reading this great book by the author Steven Johnson called 'Where Good Ideas Come From - The Natural History of Innovation.'


I wasn't expecting it, but much of it applies to nebulous thoughts that I've had about this website and offers clarification on what I wasn't able - up until now - to articulate.


Look forward to more posts of excerpted passages.


"Many of history's great innovators managed to build a cross-disciplinary 'coffeehouse' environment within their own private work routines..."

Johnson describes 'coffeehouse' similar to what one would think: messier, more chaotic and lively, a place where ideas can collide as opposed to an assembly line.

"...Charles Darwin had an immense number of side interests to distract him from his opus [On the Origin of the Species]: he studied coral reefs, bred pigeons, performed elaborate taxonomical studies of beetles and barnacles, wrote important papers of geology...None of these passions were central to the argument that would eventually be published as On the Origin of the Species, but each contributed to useful links of association and expertise to the problem evolution. The same eclectic pattern appears in countless other biographies.
Joseph Priestley
Joseph Priestley bounced between chemistry, physics, theology, and political theory.
ence of the Gulf Stream, designed stoves, and of course made a small fortune as a printer.
While John Snow was solving the mystery of cholera in the streets of London in the 1850s, he was also inventing state-of-the-art technology for the administration of ether, publishing research on lead poisoning and the resuscitation of stillborn children, yet all the while attending to his patients as a general practitioner.
Legendary innovators like Franklin, Snow and Darwin all possess some common intellectual qualities --- a certain quickness of mind, unbounded curiosity --- but they also share one other defining attribute. They have a lot of hobbies."
There you have it!
And this helps explain, to me and to you, why I created this website.
Stay tuned for more excerpts from this incredibly interesting book.